Tuesday, September 16, 2014

From The Military To The Masses.

From saving lives to your car.

Creativity and innovation are often shackled by the lack of funds, fundamentally it's expensive to create and experiment. Where the budget never seems to be lacking, especially in the US, is in the military sphere. There is no great surprise to know that many innovations we use on the roads today were initially conceived to help take and save lives.

The military can be thanked for many great innovations which have be adapted to the mass consumers. Let's take a look at a few we use on todays roads.

GPS.
The Global Positioning System, was originally developed for American Air Force and Navy use. Between 1973 and 1978, Dr. Bradford Parkinson worked with both military branches to develop the Navstar GPS system. The system uses multiple satellites to triangulate users’ location and help navigate. Today, almost every car, truck, plane & phone has a GPS system as standard with American, Chinese and European networks in use.

The JEEP.
If you know what a car is, you know what a Jeep is. 4WD technology has actually been around since the turn of the 20th century. By the 1930s, the military needed a scout car that could have speed and versatility in addition to hauling power and all-terrain capacity. The problem was that these two features were mutually exclusive from an engineering standpoint. The first Jeep that made it to battle, the Willys-Overland MB, provided the answer as the perfect army scout vehicle. Its performance in the war was so outstanding that Dwight D. Eisenhower said, “America could not have won World War II without it.”

From fighter pilots to your car.
HUD.
or 'Heads Up Display" is that floating readout graphic you see in front of fighter pilots helmets. HUD's evolved from weapons sites during 1940s, utilising reflections. It wasn't until the 1960s when the first modern version of the HUD was used by a french test-pilot Gilbert Klopfstein. In the 1970s HUD was introduced into commercial aviation and now it is a standard extra in most modern makes of cars. 

Aviators.
The classic Tom Cruise Aviators from the movie Top Gun were in fact originally designed for fighter pilots. A design that prevented as much sunlight as possible from reaching the eye led to Ray-Ban Aviator sunglasses, which became standard gear for men enlisted in the military during World War II. 



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